Center for Educational Media (MTSU)

"Okay, Stop" Activity

This session focuses on instructional strategies (e.g., acoustic highlighting) teachers and paraprofessionals can use in the classroom to make it more accessible for students with hearing loss. We look at the educational environment and how to make our classrooms acoustically appropriate for all students. In addition, we will discuss how best to work with the educational team including the interpreter, itinerant teacher, and speech-language pathologist.

My students are speaking; now what? Building oral language is more than just talking. This session introduces structures to build students’ oral language through core academic conversations using the 5 core skills of academic conversations. The presenter offers strategies to increase interaction and facilitation of conversations and to develop methods for intentional practice of oral language.

Students with ACEs, Adverse Childhood Experiences, are inherently going to display their thorns throughout their school day. Their behavior many times is an outward expression of internal turmoil. This session is designed to help stakeholders identify and eliminate what we view as thorns and instead focus on the rose possessed by students of adverse experiences. We must cultivate our strategies as administrators, teachers, and counselors to minimize the impact of behaviors while supporting students.

This session will provide an overview on The Adverse Childhood Experiences Study (ACEs) and the impact of ACEs overall. Additionally, the presenter will discuss the relationship between ACEs and brain development, cognition, language development and issues related to immigration.

In this administrative discussion on developing a Title III procedure manual, Kim Henegar (Director of Title III and Testing, Warren County Schools) shares the procedures developed for her district.

Dr. Dawn McCormack demonstrates the ideas of order (Maat) and disorder (Isfet) impact the history and culture of Ancient Egypt. Explaining how the words and drawings in tombs were constructed and why some stories wind up on sacred temples, Dr. McCormack even tells how the aspect of personalities translates between kings.

Leslie Trail talks about how she uses argument writing in her classroom.

Beth Koch and Ann Matanakilagi demonstrate how ESL Teachers can utilize Word Walls in the classroom and how their students constantly improve their understanding of vocabulary in stages building their skills from basic letter names and sounds to making meaning within sentences and comprehension.

In a school with high poverty and more than half of its students receiving EL services, a number of gaps are likely to exist in language and vocabulary, culture, college and career planning, socio-economic circumstances, and mindset. The keys to bridging these gaps lie in developing relationships and providing opportunities that allow all stakeholders to grow in their appreciation of individualities and recognition of transferable skills.

Jennifer Core (Tennessee Historical Society) explains what National History Day is, the different submission categories, and tips on how your students can succeed on a national competitive level.

Kira Duke guides teachers through the Teaching with Primary Sources website, pointing out resources teachers can use in the classroom and where to find starting point topics for students' National History Day projects.

Switching gears, Kira Duke takes a tour through the new Library of Congress website, highlighting sections like "Today in History", "Blog: Teaching with the Library of Congress", and "Teacher Resources" all with resources already prepared for your classroom use. There's also a demonstration of how to filter for specific media types (i.e. Photos, Maps, Audio or Video Recordings, Newspapers, Legislation, etc.) and more hidden features of the website.

Kira Duke leads a discussion on how using Primary Sources can help develop critical thinking skills with examples to get students in the mindset of a particular time-frame.

Jennifer Core dives into what makes a good National History Day project, shows 2018 judging rubric examples, and how a project all ties elements together.

Rebecca Welch focuses on how to use the WIDA Can Do Descriptors in the classroom and guides the group discussion around strategies that are working, best practices, grading, and ways to keep students motivated toward mastery.

Nona Hall identifies key characteristics of effective programs for English Learners including how the WIDA English Language Development Framework Training empowers all teachers to successfully serve their ELs.

Lecture on the history of Confucianism and its role in Chinese culture and government.

Choosing the Secret City: The Creation and Importance of Oak Ridge, Tennessee

This presentation includes a description of collaboration between ELL teachers and classroom teachers, a research-based discussion of why collaboration is a beneficial ELL instructional option, and how to implement a collaboration plan with key tips for elementary and secondary settings.

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