K-8 Social Studies

A lecture covering the history of Woman's Suffrage in the United States by Dr. Nancy Schurr, professor of history at the University of Tennessee. This lecture was part of a Teaching With Primary Sources Across Tennessee workshop held at the East Tennessee History Center in Knoxville Tennessee.

How can you teach math, science, writing, or anything else by telling stories? Good teachers must engage their students, so being able to keep their attention is essential. Dr. Jette Halladay will show how storytelling techniques can help you be a better teacher by being a better storyteller!

Viewing of Part I and Part II videos will meet the mandatory training requirement for Rutherford County Schools K-5 Social Studies Teachers. The training consists of two videos: Part I – Your Studies Weekly Subscription (length approximately 39 minutes) and Part II – 21st Century Learning with Studies Weekly (length approximately 1 hour 3 minutes including the 5 companion videos). Teachers should download the Studies Weekly Webinar Video Companion List and be prepared to watch the companion videos online at the appropriate times during the presentation (See the Studies Weekly Webinar Table of Contents for a step-by-step format to follow during the webinar). Educators interested in learning more may opt to continue the professional development session by watching Part III – Century Learning Continued: Student Projects.

Viewing of Part I and Part II videos will meet the mandatory training requirement for Rutherford County Schools K-5 Social Studies Teachers. The training consists of two videos: Part I – Your Studies Weekly Subscription (length approximately 39 minutes) and Part II – 21st Century Learning with Studies Weekly (length approximately 1 hour 3 minutes including the 5 companion videos). Teachers should download the Studies Weekly Webinar Video Companion List and be prepared to watch the companion videos online at the appropriate times during the presentation (See the Studies Weekly Webinar Table of Contents for a step-by-step format to follow during the webinar). Educators interested in learning more may opt to continue the professional development session by watching Part III – Century Learning Continued: Student Projects.

Synthesizing for Argument: Using Graphic Organizers

What strategies did teachers learn? What primary sources did they discover, both from the Library of Congress and in their own communities? This webcast answers these questions and more about teachers' experiences during the 2012 Civil War Summer Institute presented by Teaching with Primary Sources Across Tennessee. Staff members will be joined in studio by institute participants, and video from institute activities will illustrate the in-depth learning experiences exploring the institute theme, "Occupation."

What strategies did teachers learn? What primary sources did they discover, both from the Library of Congress and in their own communities? This webcast answers these questions and more about teachers' experiences during the 2011 Civil War Summer Institute presented by Teaching with Primary Sources Across Tennessee. Staff members will be joined in studio by institute participants, and video from institute activities will illustrate the in-depth learning experiences exploring the institute theme, "Divided Tennessee."

hat strategies did teachers learn? What primary sources did they discover, both from the Library of Congress and in their own communities? This webcast answers these questions and more about teachers' experiences during the 2011 Civil War Summer Institute presented by Teaching with Primary Sources Across Tennessee. Staff members will be joined in studio by institute participants, and video from institute activities will illustrate the in-depth learning experiences exploring the institute theme, "Divided Tennessee."

Performing arts are a rich part of America's culture, and can be used to teach a wide range of subjects beyond arts classes. This webcast explores primary sources relating to the performing arts on the Library of Congress Web site, particularly popular, professional, and folk music of early 20th-century America. Educator materials, teaching strategies, and a website demonstration are included.

This program explores the collections and resources related to conservation and environmental science available through the Library of Congress Web site, demonstrates how to use these collections and resources as effective teaching tools, and provides suggestions for how to use these materials in the classroom.

Mr. Jimmy Gentry shares his incredible and moving experiences as an American liberator of prisoners from one of the most notorious Nazi Concentration Camps of WWII, Dachau. The presenters will also note frameworks and designs used to teach about the Holocaust in elementary and middle grades classrooms. Historical facts will be shared as well as ideas for teaching the concepts of honor and tolerance. Ways to promote classroom dialogue related to cultural diversity will be emphasized.

This session highlights the folk music recordings available through the Library of Congress website, and ways to use these songs as primary sources for teaching history, literature, music, culture and folklore. Lesson ideas and tips for finding recordings on the Library of Congress website will be provided.

Join the rangers from Stones River National Battlefield for an on-site archeology program that illustrates how scientists use artifacts and the scientific method to answer research questions. Watch as teachers unearth artifacts and bring them back to the classroom to discover exciting facts about the Civil War!

This program explores the vast collections of maps available through the Library of Congress, demonstrates how to use maps as effective teaching tools, and provides materials for using these primary sources in the classroom.

This program explores many of the political cartoons available through the Library of Congress website, demonstrates how to use cartoons and illustrations as effective teaching tools, and provides supporting materials for using these primary sources in the classroom.

Tennesseans were deeply divided politically and economically in the years leading up to the Civil War, in ways that would have a major impact on the state during the war and its aftermath. Explore primary sources from this important time period on the Library of Congress website and get ideas on how to use these sources in your classrooms, as we prepare to celebrate the 150th anniversary of the beginning of the Civil War.

From anti-Semitic laws, to isolation in ghettos, to European conquest and finally death camps, history will come alive as multiple ideas are presented concerning how Holocaust studies can be integrated into middle grades social studies and history curriculums. Dr. Belsky and Dr. Boulware share how the Holocaust has impacted their worldview and how teachers can pass on to the next generation principles of making a difference in society.

Dr. Lynn Nelson walks teachers through the history of Franklin, TN, the decisions, philosophical debates, the difference between property and land, and the settlers' mentality of where Government Power originates.

The Whole (Sojourner) Truth: Historical Memory in the Classroom

Both teachers and students sometimes have questions about the use of primary sources and whether it is legitimate to use the computer for research. The answer is, of course, yes and no! This program will review Tennessee state standards for research, list the best websites featuring primary materials, and even take a hard look at the "Wikipedia dilemma.” Hand-outs include a reproducible rubric for website evaluation. The program will conclude with a tour of some Tennessee websites you will find especially helpful for your own research projects.

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