K-8 Social Studies

"Okay, Stop" Activity

A workshop on teaching with primary sources from the Library of Congress. This workshop focused on the Woman's Suffrage movement in the United States. The workshop has been split into three parts for the website. This is part one covering concepts and demonstrations. Please also see part two covering teaching strategies and group participation, and the lecture on the history of the Suffrage movement by Dr. Nancy Schurr, both shown separately.

This program will show how both sides of the Civil War sang songs about every aspect of the conflict. Students and teachers will come to appreciate how important music was in the lives of the people before, during and after the war as they listen to the songs that helped soldiers and civilians “march on” in life.

Key questions to be addressed include, Is it possible to discuss religion, in particular religious prescriptions such as divine commandments, rationally? Are disagreements on fundamental questions valuable? Can we be certain that what we believe to be right actually is right?

Key questions to be addressed include, Is it possible to discuss religion, in particular religious prescriptions such as divine commandments, rationally? Are disagreements on fundamental questions valuable? Can we be certain that what we believe to be right actually is right?

Living quietly among us in every community are people who have taken part in events that changed our nation. This program, which features interviews with participants in the lunch counter sit-ins of the Civil Rights Era, will provide tips for conducting interviews and will share some of the primary sources available for your use at the Tennessee State Library and Archives and other repositories.

The Tennessee State Library and Archives, the state’s chief repository of history, has recently launched Tennessee Remembers: Vietnam Veterans. Our aim is to help veterans of the Vietnam War preserve THEIR HISTORY by collecting original documents and memorabilia related to their in-country experiences during the war. This session will explore ways in which resources gathered during this project can be used in the classroom.

The Tennessee State Library and Archives, the state’s chief repository of history, has recently launched Tennessee Remembers: Korean Veterans. Our aim is to help veterans of the Korean War preserve their story by collecting original documents and memorabilia related to their experiences during the war. This session will explore ways in which resources gathered during this project can be used in the classroom.

As the Civil War Sesquicentennial approaches, we hear many references to this critical period of our nation’s history. The Tennessee State Library and Archives (TSLA) is a treasure trove of first-hand information about the Civil War in Tennessee and nearby states. Join us for a look at diaries, letters, and other materials that can help students get “up close and personal” with people who lived through the war.

This program will explore several episodes of Civil War history that took place in our local area. Teachers will hear Civil War historians analyze the war in Tennessee; we will also discuss a number of valuable primary sources that can shed light on specific events of the war and its effect on our area. A highlight of the program will be a "virtual field trip" to important Civil War sites in Middle Tennessee.

Emancipation was a major step in the journey African Americans made from slavery toward freedom during and after the Civil War. This program models effective strategies for engaging students in the topic of emancipation and its impact on Tennessee history and culture. Classroom teachers will demonstrate strategies such as curriculum integration that help students understand emancipation and how the transition from slavery to freedom changed the idea of citizenship in America.

Emancipation was a major step in the journey African Americans made from slavery toward freedom during and after the Civil War. In this program teachers will learn how to use primary sources such as political cartoons, photography and music to help students understand emancipation and how the transition from slavery to freedom changed the idea of citizenship in America. The program will feature classroom teachers using primary sources effectively with their students.

This webcast explores Progressive Era collections and resources available through the Library of Congress Website, demonstrates how to use a selection of primary sources from these collections with your students, and provides supporting materials for using primary sources in the classroom.

For the benefit of our college faculty: When you yourself teach young people, what works best, from your own experiences as a religious leader, in terms of bringing intercultural understanding about/between/among people of different faiths? How best do we bridge religious divides? Laurie F. Maffly-Kipp of the John C. Danforth Center on Religion and Politics at Washington University in St.

A discussion on how to use historical empathy; applying it to different events that occurred in the past to better understand why certain actions were taken.

A discussion on what to expect when visiting an archive, and ideas for what activities your class may do.

Discover the wealth of information buried in archival collections through a video documentary on the life of 4th District Congressman Joseph Landon Evins of Middle Tennessee (1910-1984). Learn how this video can spark classroom discussion on political life and encourage students to uncover the stories hidden in primary sources from archival collections.

Prepare your students for the upcoming election by taking a look at previous presidential elections in the U.S. Primary sources and other resources from the Library of Congress website will be discussed, along with ideas for using these resources in your classroom.

For the benefit of our college faculty: When you yourself teach young people, what works best, from your own experiences as a religious leader, in terms of bringing intercultural understanding about/between/among people of different faiths? How best do we bridge religious divides? M.

For the benefit of our college faculty: When you yourself teach young people, what works best, from your own experiences as a religious leader, in terms of bringing intercultural understanding about/between/among people of different faiths? How best do we bridge religious divides? M.

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